5 Basic Tips on Staying Focused When Writing a Book – Guest Post…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

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To be able to work with sheer dedication, a writer needs the ability to fully concentrate and stay focused at all times. Maintaining your focus for sustained periods can be a difficult task to do. Psychologists suggest a powerful form of concentration for writers called ‘flow’. This refers to an individual fully engaging in the task they are doing. For a writer, ‘flowing’ concentration is essential to write pieces with utmost fluency.

Inability to concentrate can be fruitless, especially for a writer. In order to make each day productive, writers must employ these 5 basic tips to stay focused on work and exercise their minds for better concentration:

Stick to the Schedule

The type of schedule you keep doesn’t matter as long as it caters to your needs and helps dedicate time to your book on a regular basis. If you’re not experienced in writing projects, avoid scheduling as you…

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5 Reasons Fiction Writers should use Critique Circle

Sounds like a winner – check it out – I plan to! 🙂

Jed Herne: Writer

Critique Circle is a free website that helps writers get feedback on their stories. It also lets you critique other writers’ stories. To use the site, you need to create a (free) account.

I’ve used Critique Circle for my WIP novel, and a recent short story. Basically, I posted excerpts from these stories onto Critique Circle, and members of the site gave me feedback.

Editing is all about gaining objectivity so that you can see your story as it truly is. Software like Pro Writing Aid helps you gain objectivity, and Critique Circle also provides objectivity in bucketloads through allowing you to get feedback from other writers.

Here’s 5 reasons you should use Critique Circle:

1. Improves your editing skills

To submit a story to be critiqued, you first need to get ‘credits.’ You get credits by critiquing other writers’ stories. This is a great system, because it develops…

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The Reality of Judging a Book by its Cover

A Writer's Path

by Katie McCoach

I think it’s time we talk about book covers.

We all know the saying “Don’t judge a book by its cover,” but let’s be honest, this usually applies to people, and not actually a book. If we are really keeping it honest here, then readers and authors alike understand that books really are judged by the cover. A book cover is the very first thing a reader sees whether that is on a shelf at the bookstore or library, or online.

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Character Goals: the Key to Great Conflict

Writers – do your characters have clear goals?

Jed Herne: Writer

“Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.” – Kurt Vonnegut

Character motivation is the key to great stories. If you think about the stories you love, chances are they’re great because everyone in them has clear goals, dreams and desires. The clashes between these goals, dreams and desires creates conflict.

For example, in Game of Thrones, every character has a clear goal. These goals make each character seem more lifelike. They also give readers a reason to root for each of the characters, which is an impressive feat considering that each book in the series features 10+ point of view characters!

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Using the 6 Types of Conflict to Create Pitch-Perfect Tension

Add this one to your lists of resources! Definitely a keeper! Click through and leave Jed a LIKE, comment or both! 😉

Jed Herne: Writer

Conflict is the lifeblood of stories. However, most of the time we think conflict can only happen between characters.

This isn’t the case. In fact, there are many other types of conflict writers can create. But before we get to those, let’s define conflict.

Conflict = result of a force stopping a character getting what they want …

… Which creates tension.

Most of the time, this opposing force will be another character. However, this force could also be a whole bunch of other things. Let’s look at the different types of conflict:

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Why you should be more specific with your husband!!!

LOL!! 😂

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

My thanks to the Vermont Varmint

for the following words of wisdom:

After 10 years, the wife starts to think their kid looks kind of strange so she decides to do a DNA test.

She finds out that the kid is actually from completely different parents.

Wife: Honey, I have something very serious to tell you.

Husband: What’s up?

Wife: According to DNA test results, this is not our kid..

Husband: Well you do remember, don’t you?

When we were leaving the hospital, you noticed that our baby had pooped.

Then you said:

Please go change the baby, I’ll wait for you here.

So I went inside, got a clean one and left the dirty one there…

License to use obtained – Copyright : Alexandr Aleabiev on 123RF Stock Photo

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When Should You Redo a Book?

Vania Margene Rheault

I was listening to a podcast today–I know, shocker. I listen to them all the time, and it sure makes scooping the kitty litter a little more tolerable.

Anyway, so the two hosts went through their usual, what are you working on, what are you working on?  And the male host (I won’t say who it was or what podcast this was) said, I’m going to redo my first book. New cover, new title, redo some of the plot, the whole thing. And the other host was like, oh, that’s great, blah blah blah.

I don’t know what I was doing then. Cleaning my bathroom? Sweeping the kitchen? But I was like, wait, what?

Rereleasing a book isn’t a new concept to anyone. Traditionally published authors (or their houses) do it all the time, especially for old books. You know it when you’re reading and someone lights up in a…

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What Can You Write in 15 Minutes?

Excellent ideas to keep moving FORWARD! 😉

A Writer's Path


by Kelsie Engen

Writers can mostly agree that writing is a time consuming process. You write a first draft, step back, revise into a second draft, send out for feedback (beta readers or developmental editor), receive and revise, send for final edits, then finally submit and (possibly change) and then publish. Whew. I get tired just writing that list.

Then factor in this: Some authors spend a decade or more writing and perfecting their novels.

So…what can you possibly do in 15 minutes?

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Why Writers Need Determination

A Writer's Path

by Whitney Carter

“I hate writing, I love having written.” – Dorothy Parker

Do you know what the single most important characteristic of a writer is? Determination. Determination translates to the discipline that sees you to writing even when you don’t feel like it, into perseverance to keep submitting in the face of rejection and through the writer’s blocks and headaches and heartaches that are the process of stringing words together.

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