Song Lyric Sunday | “Coldest Day of My Life” – The Chi-Lites

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Song Lyric Sunday was created by Helen Vahdati from This Thing Called Life One Word at a Time and author Jim Adams from A Unique Title For Me is our current guest host. For complete rules or to join in the fun, click here.

This week’s theme is  “Freeze/Cold/Ice.”

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A Lonely Man is the fourth studio album by The Chi-Lites.  Released in April of 1972, it was also the group’s most successful album, topping the R&B chart and peaking at No. 5 on the pop chart. It is frequently cited as the group’s best recording. AllMusic reviewer Craig Lytle describes the album as “flawless” and “exquisite”

The album opened with The Chi-Lites’ most successful single, Oh Girl, and ended with the eight-and-a-half-minute epic, Coldest Day of My Life.

FUN FACTS:

  • The group was formed at the Hyde Park High School in Chicago in the late 1950s as the “Chanteurs”. The original members were Eugene Record, Robert “Squirrel” Lester, and Clarence Johnson. This quartet introduced themselves at the Hyde Park High School “Senior Varieties talent show. They later recruited Marshall Thompson and Creadel “Red” Jones from the Desideros to form the Hi-lites. Noting that the name Hi-lites was already in use and wanting to honor their home town they changed their name to “The Chi-Lites” in 1964.
  • The Chi-Lites scored eleven Top Ten R&B hits from 1969 to 1974. They also charted 21 songs in the Billboard Hot 100 Pop Chart, and had chart hits in Australia, the United Kingdom, Ireland, and Canada, as well as in the U.S.
  • Eugene Record wrote or co-wrote (often with singer Barbara Acklin) a long series of hits for the group, including million-sellers, Have You Seen Her and Oh Girl.
  • 76-year old Marshall Thompson is the last living original group member.

Enjoy!

See my Song Lyric Sunday selection on Nesie’s Place.

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Disclaimer: I have no copyrights to the song and/or video and/or hyperlinks to songs and/or videos and/or gifs above. No copyright infringement intended.
 coldest day of my life
by The Chi-Lites
Songwriters:

 

I remember, oh yeah
The signs of springtime
There were birds, music
Everywhere, everywhere

Some of us played, oh yeah
And some of us cried
Can’t you see, oh, can’t you see
The tears in my eyes?

And what I had dreamed of, oh Lord
I thought it was here
10 feet tall, oh, I was riding so high
With eyes of a child, oh
Shining so bright, yes they were

Coldest days of my life
They were the coldest days of my life
I had to run for cover, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah
Cold, coldest days of my life
I thought there was no other, no, no, no, no

Lord, take away the pain
Oh, You know, You know
That it falls like rain
And it couldn’t be much worse

Down below, down below, down below
Low, down below
It just couldn’t be much worse
Down below
It just couldn’t be that bad

#My52 “… and so shall it end”

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#My52 – Week 14

Word Prompt – lizard

Word Count – Drabble – 100

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He looked peaceful.

It had been a traumatic day for them both, but more so for him.

During a lucid moment, they’d giggled about their trip to Arizona and the lizard who found his way into their SUV.

He always could make her laugh at their darkest moments.

A nurse appeared in the doorway.

“Ma’am, I’m sorry, but it’s time.”

She took his left hand into both of hers and kissed the wedding band she’d placed on his finger nineteen years ago, then turned and left the room without looking back.

She wished he could make her laugh right now.

~~~

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©2019 Felicia Denise, All Rights Reserved

 

Song Lyric Sunday | “Serpentine Fire” – Earth, Wind & Fire

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Song Lyric Sunday was created by Helen Vahdati from This Thing Called Life One Word at a Time and author Jim Adams from A Unique Title For Me is our current guest host. For complete rules or to join in the fun, click here.

This week’s theme is  “Burn/Fire/Flame.”

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Two in a row for EWF!

However, most of us know Serpentine Fire as simply a great dance song and an Earth, Wind, & Fire classic!

Enjoy!

See my Song Lyric Sunday selection on Nesie’s Place.

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Disclaimer: I have no copyrights to the song and/or video and/or hyperlinks to songs and/or videos and/or gifs above. No copyright infringement intended.
 Serpentine Fire
by Earth, Wind & Fire
Songwriters:

 

When I see your face
Like a mornin’ sun
You spark me to shine

Tell all the world
My need is fulfilled
And that’s a new design

As long as you’re near
There is no fear
Of a victory
All right

But when I’m away
Influences stray
My mind to disagree

I wanna see your face
In a morning sun
Ignite my energy, ow

The cause and effect of you
Has brought new meaning
In my life to me

Gonna tell the story o’
Morning glory
All about the serpentine fire

Gonna tell the story o’
Morning glory
All about the serpentine fire

Oh yeah, oh yeah, oh yeah
Oh yeah, oh yeah, oh yeah

I need to see your face
Like a morning sun
Ignite my energy, huh

The cause and effect of you
Has brought new meaning
In my life to me

The moments I find
When I’m inclined
To do my best, oh

The negative wins
When I give in and
Then I lose the test
(Not many times)

Gonna tell the story o’
Morning glory
All about the serpentine fire

Surely as life begun
You will as one
Battle with the serpentine fire

Oh yeah, oh yeah, oh yeah
Oh yeah, oh yeah, oh yeah

Surely as life begun
You will as one
Battle with the serpentine fire

Surely as life begun
You will as one
Battle with the serpentine fire

Gonna tell the story o’
Morning glory
All about the serpentine fire

Gonna tell the story o’
Morning glory
All about the serpentine fire

 

#My52 “And So It Begins…”

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#My52 – Week 13

Word Prompt – pillow

Word Count – Drabble – 100

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Dena leaned back against the pillow, panting.

It was over, and it was a new beginning.

The searing pain she’d felt only moments before vanished.

She pulled fresh air into her starved lungs.

Emotions overwhelmed her and tears streamed from the corners of her eyes.

Her life would never be the same.

She stretched out her arms pulling the new love of her life close.

Dena giggled as she smoothed the frown lines between his eyes and caressed his cheek.

He was everything to her.

Joy filled her soul as he held her gaze.

“Hello, Tristan Alexander. I’m your mama.”

~~~

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©2019 Felicia Denise, All Rights Reserved

 

Song Lyric Sunday | “Turn On (The Beat Box)” – Earth, Wind & Fire

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Song Lyric Sunday was created by Helen Vahdati from This Thing Called Life One Word at a Time and author Jim Adams from A Unique Title For Me is our current guest host. For complete rules or to join in the fun, click here.

This week’s theme is  Record/Jukebox/DJ/Radio.”

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Jukeboxes shrunk and took on a new look in the 70s and 80s. Everyone carried their music with them using cassette players, Walkmans, and beat boxes (aka ghetto blasters not the engineering device!)

Turn on (The Beat Box) was written by Maurice White, Rhett Lawrence and Martin Page and appeared on the soundtrack of the feature film Caddyshack II. The song also can be found on EWF’s 1988 compilation album The Best of Earth, Wind & Fire, Vol. 2.

The single rose to No. 26 on the Billboard Hot Soul Singles chart and is still an Earth, Wind & Fire concert standard.

I didn’t want to sacrifice sound quality (or time) so I went with a still video, but turn your speakers waaaay UP! It’s time to dance! 😀

Enjoy!

See my Song Lyric Sunday selection on Nesie’s Place.

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Disclaimer: I have no copyrights to the song and/or video and/or hyperlinks to songs and/or videos and/or gifs above. No copyright infringement intended.
 Turn on (the Beat box)
by Earth, Wind & Fire
Songwriters: Maurice White, Rhett Lawrence & Martin Page

 

Turn on
Have you been thinking nothing ever changes
And you could be making a difference tonight
Why are you waiting – anticipating
Can’t find the feeling when you know it’s right

Oh I just want to see you smile
Forget about yesterday
Nothing can stop you now
So what are you waiting for

Turn on, turn on the beat box baby
We’re walking on the party line
Crank it up and let the music
Turn every night into a Saturday night

Whenever you’re ready – we’ll be rocking each day
You’re gonna get lucky – leaving it all behind
Time’s ticking away – it’s another Saturday
So it’s time to bring out on the party line

Oh I just want to see you smile
Forget about yesterday
Nothing can stop you now
So what are you waiting for

Turn on, turn on the beat box baby
We’re walking on the party line
Crank it up and let the music
Turn every night into a Saturday night

It’s so bright
I know your beat box baby
Are you ready for a good time
So come on move with the feeling
And every night is a Saturday night

Turn on

Turn on, turn on the beat box baby
We’re walking on the party line
Crank it up and let the music
Turn every night into a Saturday night

It’s so bright
I know your beat box baby
Are you ready for a good time
So come on move with the feeling
And every night is a Saturday night

Turn on

Turn on, turn on the beat box baby
We’re walking on the party line
Crank it up and let the music
Turn every night into a Saturday night

It’s so bright
I know your beat box baby
Are you ready for a good time
So come on move with the feeling
And every night is a Saturday night

Beat box – beat box baby

 

 

#My52 “Night Light, Conclusion”

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#My52: Week 12

Word prompt: socks

Word count – 1685

Reading time – 4 mins,  19 secs

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Part IV

Jo walked to the stove, donned two large oven mitts and removed a deep casserole dish from the oven. Turning, she presented her surprise.

“Shepherd’s pie!”

“Dad’s favorite!”

The boys fist-bumped each other and raced off to clean up for dinner.

Jack went to the bathroom in the hallway while Kent took the small half-bath on the back porch.

While washing up, Kent raised his head and looked into the mirror.

A young version of Wes Tanner stared back at him.

Though he was often reminded of his resemblance to his father, Kent never saw it.

Until now.

Light brown hair, velvet brown eyes, pug nose.

He smiled.

There was the crooked grin.

The one dimple on the left side.

He shook his head remembering the last time he saw his father.

“Hey buddy, you finish your English homework last night?”

Kent gave his dad the thumb’s up sign, his mouth full of eggs and toast.

“And are you ready for the quiz today?”

He swallowed and grinned. “I will leave no participles dangling.”

“I look forward to being moved to tears by the glowing red A at the top of your paper.”

“Well…”

Jo entered from the back porch carrying laundry. “If you want to be moved to tears, next time you can wash his socks.”

Wes Tanner laughed aloud at his snarky wife as Kent buried his face in his hands.

“It’s okay, buddy. We’re manly men, not dainty flowers. Our socks are supposed to smell.”

Father and son high-fived.

Jack rushed into the kitchen wearing his backpack and carrying Kent’s.

“Let’s bounce, K-man. Old man Gantz is supposed to wait ten minutes but if he can’t see us from the road, you know he won’t even slow the school bus down.”

Jo frowned. “Is that old man still speeding? Why is he even still driving? Isn’t he like a hundred and forty years old?”

Jack chuckled. “Nah, he doesn’t speed. He just floors it over dips to shake up the kids in the back.”

Wes and Kent snickered.

Kent gulped his orange juice then headed for the door behind his brother.

“Don’t forget, kiddo. I’ll be at the field at 4:45 sharp.”

Kent whirled around, grinning. “You have band snack duty today?”

“Yes, I do. Juice boxes and graham crackers are already loaded in the truck.”

His face fell and he looked to his mom. “He’s kidding, right? Mom, please tell me he’s kidding.”

Jo Tanner turned away and buried her face in the towel she was folding to muffle her giggles.

Kent turned back to his father. “C’mon, dad. We’re not kinder-…”

“Bottled water, turkey jerky, Zone bars, and trail mix.”

His grin returned. “Turkey jerky and Zone bars? I’ll be the most popular kid in band.”

Wes folded his arms across his broad chest. “Wouldn’t that make me the most popular band dad, or cool… sweet, or whatever you guys call awesome?”

Kent walked over at fist-bumped with his father. “You’re all those things already, dad and more.”

Wes beamed at the compliment but before he could respond, they were both distracted by Jack calling from the driveway.

“K-man, let’s do this!”

Hiking his backpack up onto his back, Kent bolted for the door, stopping to kiss Jo’s cheek on the way.

“Bye, mom. Cya’ after band practice, dad… with turkey jerky!”

He could hear his parents laughter as he ran down the driveway to catch up with Jack when Wes called after him. “Make me proud on that English quiz!”

Kent Tanner averted his eyes from the bathroom mirror.

His dad never knew about the B+ Kent received on his English quiz and he never arrived at the football field with band snacks. By 4:45 that afternoon, Kent and Jack sat huddled together on their grandmother’s back porch, numb after learning their father was gone.

Staring again into his own eyes, Kent’s lips twitched as Wes Tanner wisdom invaded his thoughts.

“Kiddo, bad days are a part of life, but any day you live through is a good day and goes in the win column.”

He smiled despite the pain and irony of his father’s words. He wasn’t putting anything in the win column yet.

Kent returned to the kitchen and feasted on the shepherd’s pie. More stories about Wes were told. Some brought laughter, others brought tears.

Jo wasn’t surprised when during dessert, Kent told her about his nightmares.

“I’m so sorry you didn’t feel you could come to me sooner.”

“It’s okay, mom. You were so… sad. I used to have two or three a night. Now, it’s just a couple of times a week.”

“Don’t let me off so easy, sweetie. We’re all sad. It’s no excuse, but I do promise to do better.”

“Okay, momma.”

“Ooooo! “Momma,” Jack quipped.

“Leave him alone, Jackson Alan.”

“Ha! Full name! You’re in trouble!”

Kent arched away from the elbow jab Jack aimed his way.

“Kent, do you want to talk about the nightmares?”

He froze, hanging his head.

“I’m sure it’s not uncommon to have bad dreams about losing a parent, honey.”

Neither Jo nor Jack could hear his mumbled response.

“What did you say?”

He raised his head, hesitant and embarrassed. “They’re not about dad.”

Jack grabbed his wrist. “But K-man, you said-“

Kent cut him off.

“I said they started after dad died. You said you understood me having nightmares about him because of the way we lost him.” He ducked his head again. “I just didn’t correct you.”

“Baby, what are the nightmares about?”

Kent didn’t respond.

“It’s okay. You don’t have to tell us.”

He spoke without raising his head.

“I wake up for school just like always. I know dad’s gone… but I can’t find you and Jackie. I go from room to room, searching and calling your names. It’s gets weirder because it’s our house, but there are so many more rooms. And I can’t open doors to leave. The more rooms I pass through, the darker and warmer it gets until I’m drenched in sweat in the darkness.” Kent looked at his mom. “I wake up screaming… and sometimes crying because I can’t find you or my way out.”

Jack set his fork down, staring at his dessert.

Jo reached over and clasped Kent’s hand.

“You said you don’t have the nightmares as often, but you do still have them, right?”

“Yes.”

“I’m glad you told me, Kent, but I can’t explain them. What if I call Dr. Riley tomorrow and get a referral for counseling? Talking to someone who has knowledge about these things might help.”

Kent remained silent until Jack touched his arm.

“I’ll go too, K-man.”

Turning to his brother, Kent saw the love and concern siblings of a certain age dance around, but at that moment Wesley Kent Tanner knew nothing would ever come between him and his brother.

“Okay, mom, do it. I’ve got nothing to lose at this point,” he glanced back at Jack, “and everything to gain.”

JoAnna Tanner leaped from her seat, rushing to the other side of the table to hug the two boys. “I love you both madly, and we’re going to be okay.”

After exchanging man-hugs with Kent, Jack decided things were getting too mushy for him, and excused himself to take his evening run.

Kent helped Jo clean the kitchen while she quizzed him on biology terms and international capital cities.

Jack returned and after a shower, the family settled in for another Wes Tanner-favorite, the movie Spaceballs.

Jo shooed them off to bed when the movie ended, and Jack had said, “May the Schwartz be with you” one time too many.

The brothers made their way down the hall to their rooms, engaged in a duel with invisible light sabers.

Jack dropped his arms to his side and Kent moved in for the kill with a run-through.

“Hey. What gives? You gave me that one.”

Jack rested his hands on his hips Forrest Gump-style.

“K-man, I just thought of something.”

“You want me to alert the media?”

Kent laughed at his own snark, but Jack silenced him by holding up his hand.

“We know mom is out of Aunt Pearl’s good graces, but dude… what if she cuts us out of her will too?”

Frowning, Kent was about to lash out, but Jack waggled his eyebrows then moonwalked through his bedroom door.

Kent guffawed at Jack’s antics and stumbled through his own bedroom door, grateful again for his older brother.

So used to a sense of anxiousness when he entered his room every night, Kent Tanner took notice of its absence.

Pete Michaels was right.

An open conversation with his family had alleviated much of his fears. Talking with a family therapist… and time could only help take him the rest of the way.

Stripping out of his clothes, Kent pulled on a pair of flannel lounge pants and went to his dresser.

Opening the drawer, he pulled the threadbare Crowded House band t-shirt out and slipped it on.

He’d taken it from the laundry room two days after Wes Tanner died.

Every morning, Kent would open the drawer and stare at the shirt, missing his dad.

But now it was no longer a remnant of what he lost, but a reminder of who he was.

He switched off his light and crawled into bed.

His gaze went to the glow-in-the-dark night light next to his bed. Its luminance appeared brighter than usual, almost harsh. Kent considered it for a moment and decided not to drop the light into a drawer.

He wasn’t ready for that.

He hoped the nightmares didn’t come, but if they did, he would deal with them… and tell someone.

He wasn’t alone and never had been, he understood that much. Until the rest was sorted out, the night light would be his comfort instead of his protector.

Kent snuggled deep into his bed and sleep came with ease to his exhausted mind.

His last thoughts were to thank Pete for his kind words… and that he would try out for the basketball team.

Part 1    |  Part II   |  Part III  |

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©2019 Felicia Denise, All Rights Reserved

 

Song Lyric Sunday | “Midnight Blue” – Melissa Manchester

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Song Lyric Sunday was created by Helen Vahdati from This Thing Called Life One Word at a Time and author Jim Adams from A Unique Title For Me is our current guest host. For complete rules or to join in the fun, click here.

This week’s theme is  “Minutes/Hours/Days/Weeks/Months.”

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This week’s theme encompasses time and I chose the time of midnight for this selection.
Melissa Manchester released two hit-less albums on Bell Records before signing a deal with Arista, which issued her third album, Melissa, which contained Midnight Blue. The song went to #1 on the Adult Contemporary chart and established Manchester as both a songwriter and artist.
Co-written with lyricist Carole Bayer Sager, Midnight Blue was written in 1973, and released two years later, causing George Harrison to re-title his (totally unrelated) song of the same name. The Manchester song was a big hit, and has become a standard.
The song is about a relationship that has been through the ringer and the singer is looking to give it another try, approaching it from a different angle: “Think of me as your friend.”
FUN FACTS:
 

The video is a live performance from The Midnight Special.

Enjoy!

See my Song Lyric Sunday selection on Nesie’s Place.

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Disclaimer: I have no copyrights to the song and/or video and/or hyperlinks to songs and/or videos and/or gifs above. No copyright infringement intended.
 Midnight Blue
by Melissa Manchester
Songwriters: Melissa Manchester & Carole Bayer Sager

 

Whatever it is, it’ll keep till the morning
Haven’t we both got better things to do?
Midnight blue
Even the simple things become rough
Haven’t we had enough?

And I think we can make it
One more time
If we try
One more time for all the old times

For all of the times you told me you need me
Needing me now is something I could use
Midnight blue
Wouldn’t you give your hand to a friend?
Maybe it’s not the end

And I think we can make it
One more time
If we try
One more time for all the old times
Midnight blue

I think we can make it
I think we can make it
Oh, wouldn’t you give your heart to a friend?
Think of me as your friend

And I think we can make it
One more time
If we try
One more time for all of the old, old times

One more time
I think we can make it
If we try
I think we can make it
If we try
Looks like we’re gonna make it
Looks like we’re gonna make it
If we try
I think we can make it

 

#My52 “Night Light, Part III”

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#My52: Week 11

Word prompt: house

Word count – 719

Reading time – 2 mins,  11 secs

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Part III

Kent whistled. “You said that? To Aunt Pearl? What did she say?”

“Well, she wasn’t happy with me, but she said she hoped to hear from me soon and hung up.”

Jack pointed his finger across the table. “You are so out of the will now, no question.”

Jo ducked her head. “Yes, sucks to be me right about now.”

“Why didn’t we know she and dad were so close?”

“They weren’t that close.”

“But, you just said-”

Jo held up her hand.

“Aunt Pearl’s boys were like their father—loud, brash bullies… they still are. Your dad said he was grateful he didn’t share the same last name because they were always in trouble all the way through school. Aunt Pearl did what she could to keep them in line, but Uncle Ed let them get away with everything, then used his influence to protect them from being held accountable.”

“When he died, they went buck wild and ignored Aunt Pearl. Your Grandma Nettie felt sorry for her and sent your dad to run errands for her and take care of chores around the house. Pearl latched on to him for dear life. Tommy and Dale saw how she doted on your father and straightened up by their early twenties. Your dad said that was when she figured out the power of her wealth and began to use it to get her way.”

“But no matter how much your dad meant to her, I couldn’t allow her to barnstorm in here and take over our lives.”

“And as long as I’m being honest, it felt good to stand up to her. I’ve spent too much time being angry at your dad for leaving me and myself for being a wimp about it.”

“But dad didn’t leave you, mom. Not in the walk-away kind of leaving.”

“I know, baby. My mind gets that, but my heart doesn’t.”

She reached out, touching their hands. “Last revelation of honesty… I feel like a fraud for telling your aunt I’m here to help you when I haven’t been.”

Both boys opened their mouths to protest again, but a stern look from Jo stopped them.

“Look, this isn’t about absolution, deflecting blame, or even forgiveness. It’s about accountability and responsibility—two things I’ve skated on.

We lost an important part of our family, but we’re still a family. I’m your mother and Wesley Cameron Tanner would haunt me to the end of my days if I acted like anything less.”

Kent smiled at the mental pic of a ghostly Wes Tanner in a Crowded House band t-shirt and camouflage lounge pants, his favorite around-the-house attire.

“I’m a blessed woman to have shared my life with your dad, but I’m just as blessed to have you two as my sons.”

“So, going forward, new rules! One, it is okay to be sad and it is okay to cry… but it is not okay to hide it. No more hiding in my room for me, no more skulking in corners for you. Two, it is okay to talk about your father… share things, good and bad. He wasn’t a saint, and neither are we. Jack, I know you were ready to run away from home when he took your bike away for a week last year.”

Jack’s cheek’s flushed a deep crimson as he hid his face. “Oh man, the grass wasn’t even that high. I didn’t think waiting another day or two would hurt.”

“Yeah, but dad thought otherwise.”

Jack jabbed his elbow into Kent’s side, but he continued to laugh anyway.

“And rule number three,” Jo said in a raised voice to get their attention. “it is perfectly okay to ignore rules one and two.”

The Tanner brothers exchanged confused glances.

“Your mom’s not loopy or trying to be facetious. It just goes back to what I said earlier. No one can tell you how to mourn. What’s important is that you do… in your own way, and I’ll always be here for you.”

Kent stared at the genuine love and affection on his mother’s face and anxiety he’d been holding onto for too long seeped from his body.

Jo rose from the table. “Now you two go wash up for dinner and I’m going to share a happy memory of your dad.”

 

To be continued…

Part 1    |  Part II   |

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©2019 Felicia Denise, All Rights Reserved

 

Song Lyric Sunday | “Rocket Man” – Elton John

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Song Lyric Sunday was created by Helen Vahdati from This Thing Called Life One Word at a Time and author Jim Adams from A Unique Title For Me is our current guest host. For complete rules or to join in the fun, click here.

This week’s theme is  “School/Books/Learning.”

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Week two for Elton John! 🙂
  • The first stanza of Rocket Man was thought of by Bernie Taupin whilst he was on the motorway heading to his parents’ home; he had to “repeat it to himself for two hours,” which was “unfortunate”, but in later interviews he said that since it gave him a hit, it was all worthwhile.
  • Among numerous other performances, John played Rocket Man at the launch site of Space Shuttle Discovery in 1998.
  • The song includes the line, “”And I’m gonna be high as a kite by then”. The website Schmoop commented, “The phrase “high as a kite” is a common idiom almost always used to refer to drug use. There’s nothing to suggest that lyricist Bernie Taupin really intended the double entendre, but the song did come out at the peak of stoner ’70s culture. The usual meaning of the expression, which Taupin would have been familiar with, is highly intoxicated.
  • The most commonly misheard lyric in this song is “Rocket Man, burning out his fuse up here alone.” This was the centerpiece of a 2011 commercial for the Volkswagen Passat, where folks came up with all kinds of interpretations of the last few words: telephone, cheap cologne, motor home, provolone. A couple in a Passat can correctly interpret the words thanks to the car’s premium sound system, and all is well. This wasn’t the first time the song was used in a commercial; it was also featured in ads for AT&T.

The video is from a live performance in Madison Square Garden in 2000.

Enjoy!

See my Song Lyric Sunday selection on Nesie’s Place.

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Disclaimer: I have no copyrights to the song and/or video and/or hyperlinks to songs and/or videos and/or gifs above. No copyright infringement intended.
 RocKet Man (I Think it’s going to be a long, long time)
by Elton John
Songwriters: Elton John & Bernie Taupin

 

[Verse 1]
She packed my bags last night, pre-flight
Zero hour: 9:00 a.m
And I’m gonna be high as a kite by then
I miss the Earth so much, I miss my wife
It’s lonely out in space
On such a timeless flight

[Chorus]
And I think it’s gonna be a long, long time
‘Til touchdown brings me ’round again to find
I’m not the man they think I am at home
Oh no, no, no
I’m a rocket man
Rocket man
Burning out his fuse up here alone
And I think it’s gonna be a long, long time
‘Til touchdown brings me ’round again to find
I’m not the man they think I am at home
Oh no, no, no
I’m a rocket man
Rocket man
Burning out his fuse up here alone

[Verse 2]
Mars ain’t the kind of place to raise your kids
In fact, it’s cold as hell
And there’s no one there to raise them if you did
And all this science I don’t understand
It’s just my job five days a week
A rocket man
A rocket man

[Chorus]
And I think it’s gonna be a long, long time
‘Til touchdown brings me ’round again to find
I’m not the man they think I am at home
Oh no, no, no
I’m a rocket man
Rocket man
Burning out his fuse up here alone
And I think it’s gonna be a long, long time
‘Til touchdown brings me ’round again to find
I’m not the man they think I am at home
Oh no, no, no
I’m a rocket man
Rocket man
Burning out his fuse up here alone

[Outro]
And I think it’s gonna be a long, long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long, long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long, long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long, long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long, long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long, long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long, long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long, long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long, long time

#My52 “Night Light, Part II”

Night Light banner

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#My52: Week 10

Word prompt: copper

Word count – 1384

Reading time – 5 mins,  07 secs

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Part II

Jo Tanner kept a neat home, but the drain on emotions and sanity over the last two months dealt a harsh blow to the tidy organization of the Tanner home.

When the brothers left for school early that morning, the corner breakfast nook was covered in mail, newspapers, and piles of half-folded laundry… as it had been for weeks.

Now the table and benches were clear and clean, no longer a catch-all for a stressed household.

Copper cookware hung neatly above the chef’s island and its sunflower yellow countertop sparkled.

A slamming door caused Kent to look across the kitchen to see his mother enter from the back porch carrying a basket of clean laundry.

“Hey, you’re home. Good.”

Jo sat the laundry basket near the door and went to her youngest son, pulling him into a warm hug.

Kent pulled back, searching her face.

She was different.

Though sadness was still a resident in his mother’s brown eyes, they were not red and swollen from endless tears. Her features didn’t sag in defeat, and she appeared to be calm and in control.

Kent had so many questions but gave in to the lump forming in his throat and returned her hug.

The side-door opened, and mother and son turned to see Jack enter with the same wide-eyed expression Kent had worn.

Jo raised her hand, beckoning for her firstborn to join them.

Without a word, Jack dropped his backpack and raced into the group hug.

With an arm around each of her sons, Jo gave them both a tight squeeze before pulling back and looking up into their faces.

“I’m sure I have more tears to shed, but not now.” She took a deep breath, steeling herself. “Your dad and I had so many plans for the future—things we wanted to do with you boys and things for the two of us after you guys were on your own.”

“He was bigger than life to me and I’ve loved him since the day we met at a peace rally in front of the public library. I saw us growing old together, spoiling your kids and fussing about dentures.”

Jack and Kent smiled while their hearts broke for the memories their mother would never have.

“I know there’re no guarantees in life, but I never imagined losing the love of my life to a massive heart attack at only forty-two years of age. Dang man had never even had a cold in twenty years, then he just up and dies…”

The brothers tightened their grip on their mother, holding her up.

“It broke me, and I allowed it. I was doing things by rote, ignoring everything that took thought,” she looked at each of them, “ignoring my boys.”

Jack and Kent protested.

“Mom, we understood-”

“It wasn’t like that-”

She shushed them both.

“That’s exactly what it’s like… how it’s been.”

“After the funeral when everyone was outback and your great-aunt Pearl gave you both a dressing down because you weren’t sad and crying enough to meet her definition of grief, I said nothing.”

“Mom, it was the worst day of our lives, give yourself a break.”

“Exactly, baby, it was the worst day of our lives, but I could only think of myself.”

“Mom-”

“No. I didn’t protect my children. I know Aunt Pearl meant well in her own too-nosy-for-her-own-good way, but I should have said something.”

Kent interrupted her.

“But no one else did either, mom.”

“Hmmpf. That’s because she has money, and no one wants to get cut from her will.”

The truth of the comment made them all chuckle.

“But Pearl never knows—or doesn’t care—when to stop. She’s called every few days. Sometimes I answer, sometimes I don’t.”

“What’s she calling for?”

Jo scoffed. “As she put it, ‘it’s her familial duty to make sure we’re okay,’ but it’s always about money with her. Offers to pay for a housekeeper or handyman, hire help for the crop rotation, even send us on a getaway trip for healing.”

Jack threw his head back and yelled, “Vegas!”

Jo laughed too, smacking his arm. “No, Mr. still-a-minor. I thanked her but said no thank you.”

Kent smirked. “I hear the sound of scissors… cutting you out of her will, mom.”

The Tanner family belly laughed together for the first time in months and Jo led her boys over to the breakfast nook. After they were seated, Jo became serious.

“It had been over two weeks since Aunt Pearl’s last call. I’d hoped she’d found someone else to harass.”

Jo shook her head.

“I wasn’t that lucky. She called this morning right after you guys left for school.”

Jack frowned. “Dang, mom. We left at six-fifteen. You said it was rude to call anyone before eight in the morning.”

“That’s for normal people who don’t believe the world revolves around them, honey. Aunt Pearl doesn’t fall into that category.”

“What did she want, mom? You look like she upset you.”

“Oh, yeah… big-time. She started right in the second I answered the phone.”

 

“Morning, Aunt Pearl.”

“Hello, JoAnna. How are the boys?”

“The boys are fine. They’ve already left for school.”

“No, I mean how are the boys, really? It’s only been two months since Wes died. Have they mourned properly?”

“Aunt Pearl, what is the proper way to mourn? Everyone deals with grief in different ways.”

“Oh, don’t get all defensive, dear. Everyone knows those boys were as crazy about Wes as he was them. Their life paradigm is forever changed. And no matter how big they are in size; Jackie and Kent are still children. I’d expect them to shed buckets of tears.”

“Auntie, again, there is no right or wrong way to mourn for anyone… children or adults. My boys were in shock just as I was. And yes, it is life-changing, but the boys had a father they loved and looked up to. I doubt losing him will alter their personalities. Wes’ death was so… so sudden. It still doesn’t feel real, but it is, and we’ll deal with it.”

“I know, dear, I know. That’s why I’ve cleared my calendar all the way to fall.”

“Huh? What? Auntie, what does that mean?”

“I’m coming to stay with you for a few months. While the boys wrap up the school year, I’ll line up a housekeeper for you and get some field help scheduled all the way through harvest. Then when the boys are on summer break, I’ll-”

“No.”

“… get them scheduled for some-”

“I said no.”

“… counseling and maybe even a trip to the Grand-”

“Aunt Pearl, are you listening to me? I said no!”

“There’s no need to raise your voice and get so dramatic, JoAnna. I’m just trying to help my family the best way I know how.”

“I’m sorry for yelling, Auntie, and I appreciate your generosity, but my answer is still no.”

“Why are you being so stubborn about this? Wes was my favorite nephew… closer to me than my own boys. Jackie and Kent are all I have left of him.” Her voice faltered. “It-it hurts to look at Kent sometimes. He’s the spitting image of his father. Please, let me help them through this.”

“Aunt Pearl listen to me. I know you miss Wes too, but you can’t work through your grief by forcing yourself on the boys-”

“JoAnna! I’m not forcing-”

“Let me finish. You can’t channel your grief through them. You cannot make them feel what you are feeling. They have to work through this on their own in their own way and if they need help, it comes from me.”

“JoAnna-”

“The boys have band camp and sports camp this summer. But I promise to sit down with them and go over their schedules. If they want to visit you together or separately, I will make that happen. But, it will be their decision to make.”

 

Jack and Kent stared at their mother with their mouths hanging open.

Kent whistled. “You said that? To Aunt Pearl? What did she say?”

“Well, she wasn’t happy with me, but she said she hoped to hear from me soon and hung up.”

Jack pointed his finger across the table. “You are so out of the will now, no question.”

 

To be continued…

Part 1    |

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